Sample Excerpt of the Gypsy Fiddle Collection

(not in original design and lay-out)  

 

Content:

 

 

Introduction………………….…
 
Russia.…………………………..............                           
  1. Petyorshka.…………………………...

         2.         Korobuchka.………………………….

         3.         Silent Fields ………………………….

  1. Heissa Troika………………………...

         5.         Ochi Chernye.………………………...

         6.         Moscova.………………………………

         7.         Deep Sorrow………………………….

         8.         Kikko………………………………….

         9.         Riabinushka………………………….

       10.       Cossack’s Farewell…………………..

       11.       Katjusha………………………………

 

Hungary:…………………………..….

  1. Halljαtok Cigαnyok…………………..
  2. Csak Egy Kislαn Van a Vilαgon……..
  3. Maros Vize……………………………
  4. Haragszom a tφkφdre………………..
  5. Bihαri Nσta……………………………
  6. Holla, Repόl a Szan………………….
  7. Jaj de szιp kιk szeme……………….
  8. Egy Cica, Kιt Cica…………………...
  9. Hungarian Romance……...…………
  10. Suga a Fόlιbe………………………..
  11. Minek a Szφke Ιnnιkem……………

 

Romania:………………….…………..

  1. Promoroaca…………………………...
  2. Hora Nunzi……………………………
  3. Bringing in the Sheep………………..
  4. Ze Dode……………………………….
  5. Hora de la Risipiti……………………
  6. Arestelle………………………………
  7. Geamparale…………………………..

 

Ex-Yugoslavia:……..…………...

  1. Tama Daleko…………………………
  2. Taljanska…………………………….
  3. Ajde Jano…………………………….

 

2

 

3

4

5

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

 

14

15

16

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

24

24

 

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

 

33

34

35

36

  1. Opa Cupa………………………….…
  2. Buba Maro…………………………...
  3. Serbian Rumba………………………
  4. Ederlezi………………………………
  5. Kolo Resavka………………………..
  6. Makedonsko Devojce………………..
  7. Jovano, Jovanke…………………….

 

Poland, Czech Republic

& Slovakia:……………………………

       40.       Song of the Kujaviacy………………
  1. Nane Cocha, Nane Gat………..……
  2. Lakre Bala………………………….
  3. Jai Mamo…………………………….
       44.       Sedlak………………………………..
  1. Czαrdαs………………………………

 

Bulgaria:…………………………….

  1. Rachensita……………………………
  2. Djunjuritsa…………………………..
  3. Gankino………………………………

 

Romany Tunes:…………………

  1. Fuli Tschai…………………………..
  2. Nane Love……………………………
  3. Dui Dui Dešu Dui……………………
  4. Jai Souvent Plιurι………………….
  5. Me Hum Mato……………………….
  6. O Poštari Zavel……………………..
  7. Ara More Katarma…………………
  8. Romany Czαrdαs……………………
  9. Prsi, Prsi……………………………..
  10. Zigano……………………………….

 

Virtuoso Gypsy Pieces:

  1. Whistle Hora…………………………
  2. Rumunska Igra………………………
  3. Serbian Kolo ……….………………..
  4. Humorosso…………………………..
  5. Hora Matishore………………………

 

Glossary:…………………………..

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

 

 

44

45

45

46

46

47

47

 

48

49

50

52

 

53

54

55

55

56

58

59

59

60

60

61

 

 

62

63

64

66

67

 

68

 


 

Introduction

 

Introduction

 

Dear Gypsy fiddle players,

 

Welcome to the rich world of Eastern European and Balkan music here in the “Gypsy Fiddle Collection”. I have created this book to share my favourite Gypsy and folk pieces from Eastern Europe and the Balkans with you. I have organized them into the different regions where I believe they have originated from.

I didn’t make a big effort to classify what is Gypsy and what is folk because often it is very difficult to trace a tune back to its roots – is it Gypsies playing folk tunes or folk musicians playing Gypsy tunes?

 

I did make a big effort, though, to notate the music as close to the interpretation as possible but I find it impossible to communicate the real feeling and phrasing with classical notation. The tradition is to pass on the knowledge from generation to generation by ear. Also, Roma don’t trust books, because, as they say, ‘how do you know it is true what is written in there’??? I certainly don’t…

 

To give you the opportunity to follow tradition combined with modern learning this book is accompanied by a CD – you can learn the notes quickly by reading, and then spend time listening to pick up the mood of the piece, and not just the mood, but the precise phrasing, the timing and accentuation of the ornamentation. Especially in the rubato pieces, it would make it very hard to learn the piece, if I attempted to write down all notes as I play them. Mostly you will find a skeleton melody line and the recording is at hand to give you the inspiration to use your own creativity.

 

You will find a short paragraph about the music of each country. This is as much based on fact as it is on my own experience of learning the music from mostly traditional sources and performing it.

 

I hope you have as much fun as I do learning, exploring and performing these pieces!

 

Gundula

 

 

There are a few people I would like to acknowledge here:

First of all the great artist and my lovely friend Rima who created this amazing cover image and was in other ways very supportive…

Then there are various Roma musician friends and acquaintances who taught me various tunes: Caliu from Taraf de Haidouks, Tcha Limberger and Stano to mention but a few.

Another very good friend is Melissa who has spent time with Gypsies in Czech Republic and Slovakia and passed on some of their tunes to me.

More thoughts go to Živorad who proofread all the music and made a lot of effort to record all those tunes with me, to Pawlina, who also did a lot of proofreading and was a big help in getting this project published, and to Egemen, who is a big fan of Balkan music and was great support in finishing the project.

 

A big Thank You to all of you!

 

 

 

Collection, notation, arrangement and layout by Gundula Gruen

gundula@magicviolin.co.uk

www.magicviolin.co.uk

 

Cover painting by Rima Staines

www.the-hermitage.org.uk

 

All rights reserved © 2005

Unauthorised copying prohibited!


 

 

Russia

 

 

 

 

‘Show me a people with more songs’ (quote by N.V. Gogol, little Russia music page)

Russian folk and Gypsy music is very passionate and colourful, outgoing in its expressions accompanying all situations that life might confront you with. Lyrics tell of love, weddings and harvests and of vodka and horse carriage trips and parties. Russia is famous for Casatchok and Cossack-dancing and for its powerful male choirs.

 

Russian instrumental music is rich in colourful sounds, virtuoso runs and expressive articulation; ‘the violin cries, laughs, moans, argues angrily or dances like the devil….’

Apart from trills, slides and runs there’s not so much ornamentation, the tune itself contains it all.

 

The notated ornamentation in this culture can be quite similarly interpreted as in classical music. It is very common to link phrases by adding runs, slides, arpeggios, or play “around” even notes. Example:                              

is performed

 
                                                                                                                                         

 

 

Fast tunes sometimes speed up at the end and mostly finish with powerful chords.

 

Much of Russian Gypsy music is in minor keys, generally harmonic minor, giving it a slightly exotic feel.

 

The oldest and most soulful instruments in Russia are the ‘balalaika’ and the ‘domra’. Both are stringed instruments that are plucked with the fingers, the first one with a triangular body and the latter with a round body.

 

The most famous instrument is probably the ‘bayan’ – the button accordion; there are many virtuoso players. The lead instrument in contemporary performances is the violin, often accompanied by bayan, guitar and double bass.

 

 


 

Petyorshka

 

 

‘Petyorshka’ = ‘a fiver’. This is an old Russian song about a man who hires a carriage and three horses with his last five rubles. Quickly he rushes to reach his beloved girl. But she refuses him and so he decides to go to the Gypsies instead where he finds pretty girls, music and vodka.